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Chosen as one of the Top 30 Organic Gardening Blogs – March 2018

Your Garden - How Penelope Hobhouse Can Help Make it Better

Life is filled with delightful surprises.

In talking to our neighbors my husband discovered that we shared similar taste in movies. Thus, Bill started sharing our best Swashbucklers and other favorites with them. The other day he brought home one belonging to our neighbors, which turned out to be a garden DVD rather than a movie. IT WAS WONDERFUL!

Gardens of the World with Audry Hepburn. It’s done in “Chapters” similar to a book.

In the Flower Garden “Chapter” of the program, Audrey Hepburn visited various Flower Gardens throughout the world. The one I found much to my liking was —–read more—-

Cont'd - Adding Organic Matter - 2nd Key to Soil Improvement

If you are just joining me I recommend you read the articles that preceded this article. Here are the links:

Soil Improvement – Your Foundation for Success;   Soil Preparation – 1st Key to Soil Improvement; Cont’d. Soil Preparation – 1st Key to Soil Improvementfirst part of Adding Organic Matter – 2nd Key to Soil Improvement

Repeated Tilling and Hoeing -Their Effect on Organic Matter

One of the things that I’ll bet will come as a shocker to many is the fact that repeated tilling and hoeing destroy organic matter in the soil.  Tilling and hoeing are so common and so much a part of human culture worldwide that it’s almost sad to have to think of them as being something that is not particularly good for our soil.  The good news is —-the key word here is ‘repeated‘.

Tilling and hoeing expose soil organic matter to more oxygen and thus oxidation. Oxidation “burns” away the organic matter.

Your plants need —–read more—-

Adding Organic Matter - 2nd Key to Soil Improvement

If you are just joining me I recommend you read the articles that preceded this article. Here are the links:

Soil Improvement – Your Foundation for Success; Soil Preparation – 1st Key to Soil Improvement;   Cont’d. Soil Preparation – 1st Key to Soil Improvement

Part 3 –

Organic matter is anything in the soil that was living and has decayed.

This act of increasing organic matter in your soil by adding organic material will be of great significance and value to your garden.  It will have a profound effect on your garden’s success and the survival and well-being of your crops.

The study of soil has been extensive and the knowledge that organic matter is necessary to raise crops successfully is widely available. Yet, worldwide crop production has resulted in a decline in soil organic matter and thus, a decline in soil fertility.

The chemical companies great —–read more—-

Cont'd.- Soil Preparation - 1st Key to Soil Improvement

If you are just joining me please read Soil Improvement – Your Foundation to Success and the first part of this post, Soil Preparation – 1st Key to Soil Improvement.

Best Time to Prepare Your Soil

The best time is either spring or fall.  The main thing you want to try to avoid is hot, dry-as-a-bone ground and extremely hot temperatures. Try to work in soil that is neither too wet nor too dry.  It’s best to work when temperatures are pleasant — best for your body, best for your mental outlook, and best for your soil.

Never till wet soil because it will cause heavy clodding and the layer beneath will become further compacted.

Before You Begin

If you’ve done any —–read more—-

Daylilies - an Asset to Your Landscape

What a great year for daylilies!  They’ve had sufficient spring rain and a good winter and the blooms promise to be abundant.

They are one of the easiest plants to grow, requiring little maintenance. They are not fussy about soil but they prefer it well-drained.

In general they like at least 6 hours of direct sun per day, but will tolerate part-shade. The  reds especially benefit from partial shade conditions in the heat of the day. If you love daylilies but think you can’t grow them, try some of the —–read more—-

ARS Master Rosarian Recommends Floribundas - Part 7

If you are just joining us, please read the Part 1Part 2Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, & Part 6 of 7 parts

May 25, 2010

Floribundas Part 7 by Charlotte Hundley, ARS Master Rosarian

My final recommendations for Tending My Garden readers are Leonardo da Vinci, a relatively new rose (introduced in 1994) with an old world feel.  And the —–read more—-

ARS Master Rosarian Recommends Floribundas - Part 6

If you are just joining us, please read the Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, & Part 5 of 7 parts

May 24, 2010

Floribundas Part 6 by Charlotte Hundley, ARS Master Rosarian

The medium pink double bloom sprays of today’s recommendation, —–read more—-

ARS Master Rosarian Recommends Floribundas - Part 4

If you are just joining us, please read the Part 1 and Part 2 and Part 3 of 7 Parts

May 22, 2010

Floribundas Part 4 by Charlotte Hundley, ARS Master Rosarian

You can’t get too much more spectacular than —–read more—-

ARS Master Rosarian Recommends Floribundas - Part 3

If you are just joining us, please read the Part 1 and Part 2 of 7 parts.

May 21, 2010

Floribundas Part 3 by Charlotte Hundley, ARS Master Rosarian

I have two recommendations for today: —–read more—-

Sedum - Time for New Starts

April 18

If you have gardened for any length of time you probably have some form (if not many) of Sedum, also known as stonecrop.

My border would not be complete without lots of it.  Its sun loving (although I have some growing in the shade as well) and drought-tolerant; actually enjoys poor soil and comes in hundreds of varieties in shapes and sizes from tiny to tall. As long as the soil drainage is good, it will make a beautiful presence in your perennial border.

Once you have it – with a few minutes of attention each spring — you should never be without it.

Sedums are among the easiest plants to start from cuttings.  Although you can start your cuttings in flats or pots and transplant where you want them,  I save lots of time by starting them —–read more—-