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The Path Less Traveled

I’m definitely coming into the home stretch and should be finished with the book this week!! Frankly, I thought I’d already BE finished.  Every time I think I’m done — something else comes up that needs to be in it.

Today I’ve added some things to the first section to give the reader a better idea of my views (or philosophy). You already know me well and know what I believe and who I am right to my core — but there is no way that a person just picking the book up would know that.  And I do feel they will get more out of the book if they know from the beginning where I stand on things.

As always – I’d appreciate your input.

Here’s one of the Chapters I’ve added:

Section I – CHAPTER 5
The Path Less Traveled

I noticed that on the website of International Ag Labs (aglabs.com), a company that specializes in soil tests for the biological or organic farmers or gardeners, conventional agriculture was referred to as Toxic Agriculture.

They sure nailed that one.

The very touchstone (standard) of nature has been ignored by today’s agricultural practices.

Rather than being looked to as the force that sets the standard for agriculture — nature is thought of now as something to be controlled. (Good luck with that line of thought.)

And of course the concept promoted by chemical companies is that nature just can’t do it on her own and needs NPK, 10-10-10, lime, Roundup and all the rest of it to help her out.

Aglabs.com put it beautifully when they said, “Instead of asking if new technology or practices were good for soil biology and plant, animal, and human health, the primary question became one of profitability for agri-business suppliers.

“Biological agriculture (methods that work with nature), on the other hand seeks to work with biology (nature) and to increase it. This is the path less traveled.

“Biological agriculture seeks to produce food, fiber, and forage in a non-toxic environment with adequate nutritional support to grow a quality crop.”

This book is all about working with nature.  I took the path less traveled many years ago.  I’ve found it a pretty good path to be on.

Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

Last part of the poem “The Path Not Taken”
by Robert Frost

_______________________

copyright by Theresa Martz 2014

9 comments to The Path Less Traveled

  • Beppy

    Very good as usual. I know you are feeling frantic as the new growing season approaches.
    Beppy

  • Betty Dotson

    Bravo, Theresa!

    I hope that you included the web address to your blog in your book.

    I want everyone to have access to all of the wonderful information you have shared with us.

    Please let us know the minute we can purchase the book.

    Keep up the good work,
    Betty

  • Theresa

    Yes — frantic is a good description Beppy! There is a lot being left undone. So I’ll be happy to wrap this up.
    And yes Betty – I have included the web address to TMG in the book. And I will keep you totally updated about when the book goes to the printers and when it’s available!

    Thanks so much for the encouragement!
    Theresa

  • Toni Brock

    Excellent point Theresa. I was going to say what Betty said : Please let us know when we can purchase the book. I know you may not have the time as the book is being finished, although, you are the person most important to share with the conversation I had with one of my dental patients the other day. I work in an office right in the middle of Oregons biggest agricultural area and so a lot of my patients are farmers. One of them told me they lost a field of radish (grown for seed), a loss totally $30,000! The reason being, a local back yard farmer let some of his radish go to seed and it crossed with the big field. The solution and deduction this person and many farmers around here come to is physically removing unwanted things out of others yards, and sticking to the philosophy that organic farming is ruining this country! I was very crestfallen to hear this. I could not have a conversation because I was in my work environment and it would not have been appropriate. It did make me worry with the thought that I don’t know how I could have convinced him or many others around this country to farm a different way. They say they would go broke. I feel very fortunate that I live 20 miles away on 13 acres that is surrounded by very mature Douglas Fir trees thus very secluded. On the other hand having taken an indepth Permaculture Course with Geoff Lawton, I feel I should have a well versed dialog for just these occasions, and I really fumble with the thoughts. I guess what I am feeling is just a little hopeless for the big picture. And that is why I am so very glad I found you. The positive solutions you provide me with regularly are so important to me. When I read your blogs and have any conversation with you, I come away feeling energized and hopeful, with a purpose. Thank you!

  • Theresa

    I feel what you’re going through Toni. I’ll answer your comment in greater depth as soon as I can.
    We (all of us who garden organically) can not convince anyone of anything — until they are ready to be convinced.
    All we can do at this point is be the example. Remember — they are totally brain washed by the information they are being fed by big agri-business and chemical companies.

    They may have to experience certain things before they get it.

    So glad that my writing energize and encourage you! Iron sharpens iron. We all need each other.

    Thanks Toni!
    Theresa

  • sandra

    Toni’s experience is sort of typical of how conventional farmers think, I suppose. Her reasons are also why I enjoy TMG so much, Theresa. A place of sanity and common sense and encouragement. I’m glad you took the less travelled road, and that I found you as you went.

  • Theresa

    I’m glad you found me too Sandra. You’ve added a lot to life for me as well.
    Theresa

  • Jack

    Awesome news that you’re winding down, almost finished with the book! I’m looking forward to buying a few copies.

    Your comment re: we can’t convince anyone of anything – until they’re ready to be convinced couldn’t be more true! It seems, big ag, the FDA and all the corporations that profit from field to table, have embedded the notion that “GMOs are safe”. The big money buys the ability to outright lie/deceive AND get away with it!, even though the real Information is at everyone’s fingertips. Teach your children well!

    Unfortunately, many of those coming around to the truth have already been affected health wise! I would love to think, it’s all inevitable, that one day, there will be enough driving force to reverse it all. The cigarette companies once said smoking was harmless, now smokers are a dying breed. The whole subject would make a great horror/sci-fi flick, too bad it’s non-fiction 🙁

  • Theresa

    That’s exactly like how I see it Jack!
    And yes — most of those coming around to the truth have already been affected health wise. That’s usually when folks make the change to organic —- when they find out the hard way about what conventional agriculture really does. Sad.
    Bill and I discuss often — that the reason most people just don’t believe what’s going on when it’s presented to them is because the truth reads like science fiction.
    Appreciate your comment a lot.
    Theresa

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