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Organic Gardening Blogs

Chosen as one of the Top 30 Organic Gardening Blogs – March 2018

Residual Herbicides in Compost Part 2: On Grow Mix, Potting Mix, Compost, Manure, & Mulch

If you are just joining me and have not read the first part, please read through Part 1 to gain a more complete picture of what is being discussed.

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As I mentioned at the end of Part 1, my friend was ready to throw in the towel and not buy anymore potting soil and/or grow mix, compost or mulch.

And I must admit that in this day and age it is difficult to find products suitable for organic gardening, but they are out there.

Below are 3 points I think you will find helpful:

  • OMRI Listed – A Visible Indication of Product Suitability –   Organic Materials Review Institute is a non-profit organization that evaluates products for the organic industry. If the product you are looking at is marked “OMRI Listed” it has been reviewed and is consistent with the requirements of the National Organic Standard.

“OMRI Listed” is indeed a excellent indication of product suitability, but remember something very important when you are buying anything —–read more—-

Planting Perennials - Is Bigger Better?

Last year there was a section of my border/garden that was totally neglected.  This year it got first billing — well almost anyway— and in January we reduced its size and altered its shape. I lifted many plants (dutch iris, daylilies, aster, phlox) and laid them beside the border until I could get to them.  Then the cold and snow came in February.

Here it is April already and only yesterday (March 31, 2010) did I finally get to the huge plants that had been lifted and left bare on the ground.

Having these huge plants before me made me think back to some of the folks I have sold perennials to over the years.  They would have loved to have had a huge 10 to 20 lb clump of a plant to plop —–read more—-

10 Reasons to Mulch

March 18

Its only when the ground is frozen solid or snow is on the ground that I can’t really do anything in the garden and yard — except maybe peek at the lettuce under the cold frame.  This past February was such a month, so I lost almost an entire month of enjoying my yard and garden.

Fortunately most Virginia winters are such that I can accomplish a lot outside and get a jump on things before green growth takes over.  For me anywhere from 40 to 60 degrees is perfect for working outside.

In January this year I cut the ornamental grasses (I usually wait until March), and cut back some leather leafs and variegated shrubs that we use as a hedge along the side of the property that had grown about 10 to 15 feet tall. The mocking birds and thrashers loved them and were becoming quite prolific.  Both are aggressive birds and —–read more—-