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Chosen as one of the Top 30 Organic Gardening Blogs – March 2018

Potato Talk – Varieties/Potato Beetles/Help from Wasps

Potatoes are in more than a dozen spots throughout my garden. The plants are beautiful and looking at them is enjoyable as I check everything each day.

I grow several varieties: Chieftan, Norland, Butte, Yukon Gold, Rose Gold, Kennebec and another russet whose name has been long forgotten.

When Bill was alive more potatoes were needed. Now it’s no longer necessary for me to […]

Assumptions/Watering/Onions and Most other Vegetables/3 keys

Since I first started TendingMyGarden.com in 2010, one of the things that I’ve found to be strong within gardeners is the urge to water.

The urge is so strong that unless someone literally has no way of watering (other than maybe hauling an occasional watering can to a plant – like my situation) they never really know what the plants will or can do.

[…]

Garden Lettuce – Read This if You Hate It, Love It and/or Want Superior Seed

About everything you can think of tastes better when you grow it yourself;  especially from an organic garden that works with nature . The only exception I can think of is if you grow varieties that have little or no taste.

Grow the Right Variety

Sometime back a reader told me her husband didn’t like garden lettuce. He preferred store bought. I’d almost be […]

Make Gardening More Fun/ Save Time & Money with Fundamentals (seed, nitrogen, onions, forced growth, peppers, hybrids)

Many products and even growing methods are deemed necessary ONLY as a result of exchanging nature’s simple, but efficient, way for something complicated. […]

February Garden Talk – Onions Seedlings – Unconventional Tips – Planting Cole Crops Early – Discovering Easy Seed Starting and Other stuff

Planted 4 varieties of onions with  good storage potential on January 15th. Yellow Parma, Australian Brown, Stuttgarters and Mako. They’re up about 4 or 5 inches.

Onion seedlings outside in containers.  Started January 15th.

 

Spinach just germinated two days ago.

Friend and reader, Betty Taylor, in Tennessee grows Stuttgarters and has given excellent reviews on their keeping ability.

If you’re interested […]

Onions – Helping A Reader – Should She Plant According to Directions on the Package?

I received an email today from long time friend and reader, Toni, from Oregon.

She writes:

I’m looking on my onion seed packets. These are seeds grown for companies locally. They all say to plant the seeds directly into the garden from April to mid-July. This is really confusing me. Do you think I should try doing that?

Because of your direction in blog […]

Best Dates to Plant – How Can You Know?

I started onion seed the 15th of this month, which according to the Farmer’s Almanac was one of the two best days to plant root crops.

All 10 jugs are on my washing machine on the porch. Day time temperatures there are about 55 degrees and sometimes when it’s sunny — 60º F. That’s about perfect for quick germination.

Starting Friday the 10 day […]

Are You Still Harvesting Peppers After the Freeze? You Could Be.

Peppers are one of the strongest plants in the garden. They want to survive and produce. And they do.

Two inch seedlings can sit and wait two months for the right conditions to grow. Then they quickly grow into bushy 3 to 6 feet plants depending on the variety.

Even seedlings planted in the “not-so-great” parts of the garden, give it their all and […]

A Reader’s Onions Make the Cover of Onion Catalog

A fellow reader of TMG has just had his Copra onions make the cover of the 2018 catalog from Dixondale Farms. As I’ve mentioned before, they’re one of, if not the biggest onion grower in the world.

You can see the same great close up of Jim’s Copra onions if you go to their website.  It’ll be the first picture that comes up in […]

Early Fall/Late Summer Garden – Pictures and Observations

Click the pictures to enlarge them and get a better look.

Tomatoes

All except one tomato plant gave up producing about 6 weeks sooner than usual. That means no tomatoes for me in December and/or January.

The most beautiful and most productive tomato plant was the one in the fence border close to my back door. It’s still producing! And it’s why I’ll have […]